Jack of all Trades: A Review of The Harp of Kings, by Juliet Marillier

Folklore is ingrained in cultures around the world and is one of the most common inspirations for fantasy fiction around.  For as long humans have been curious and looking for explanations, folklore has been there to fill in the gaps.  Human minds created thousands of fantastical creatures and unique worlds, separate from our own in an effort to explain the workings of the world.  A family with an unruly child might be nurturing a changeling, while the striking of lightning might signal the fury of a grand spirit.  When items went missing in a house, there were stolen by gremlins or other creatures.  These beliefs used to be common knowledge, known to be true around the world.  But there comes a certain point in every culture when people stop believing, when the explanations for phenomena are found to be mundane.  The belief may be gone, but the influence of these stories lingers.

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Redeemer: A Review of The Dragon Republic, by R. F. Kuang

A certain amount of pressure is placed on an author’s second novel, especially when the first novel gains the level of attention and acclaim of R. F. Kuang’s The Poppy War.  A second novel, whether it be the second ever or the second in a series, is expected to be better written than its predecessor.  A second novel is expected to have a better understanding of plot, of its characters, and of its readers’ expectations.  A second novel is expected to improve upon the first in every conceivable way.  This is easier said than done for most authors, and is easier to accomplish in the beginning of a career, where there is still learning to be done.  The longer an author writes, the more series, they craft, the greater the risk of sequelitis setting in.  Sometimes, the second story is worse than the first.  The Dragon Republic, R. F. Kuang’s second novel, is a sequel done absolutely right.

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