Jack of all Trades: A Review of The Harp of Kings, by Juliet Marillier

Folklore is ingrained in cultures around the world and is one of the most common inspirations for fantasy fiction around.  For as long humans have been curious and looking for explanations, folklore has been there to fill in the gaps.  Human minds created thousands of fantastical creatures and unique worlds, separate from our own in an effort to explain the workings of the world.  A family with an unruly child might be nurturing a changeling, while the striking of lightning might signal the fury of a grand spirit.  When items went missing in a house, there were stolen by gremlins or other creatures.  These beliefs used to be common knowledge, known to be true around the world.  But there comes a certain point in every culture when people stop believing, when the explanations for phenomena are found to be mundane.  The belief may be gone, but the influence of these stories lingers.

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King and Monster: A Review of Black Leopard, Red Wolf, by Marlon James

Black Leopard, Red Wolf is a tome of a book.  Well over six hundred pages, this is a fantasy epic with a modern writing style.  This book is not a quick read.  It is dense, and every page is packed with beautiful prose, fascinating characters, and different worlds.  This is the type of book that transports you easily and refuses to let you go, making sure you dwell in the world it is building.  The density of the novel does not end up being a drawback, and you can feel the journey the characters have taken by the time you close it on page six hundred twenty.  This is the kind of density that submerges you fully in the narrative, and transports you to a world so unlike other mainstream fantasy.  This review will not do the novel justice.  Only reading it can.

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