Oath in Ink: A Review of The Outlaw and the Upstart King, by Rod Duncan

Some of the best novel series understand that, in order to keep a fictional world interesting, they need to change or play with the genre in some way.  A novel is never just science-fiction, it can be a mystery set in a science-fiction universe.  Or the first novel can be hard science-fiction, where the second brings fantasy elements into the mix.  With The Outlaw and the Upstart King, Rod Duncan’s follow up to last year’s steampunk adventure The Queen of all Crows, he takes readers away from his sci-fi Victorian setting and to somewhere new.  The setting of this second novel resembles a more medieval, violent Arthurian wilderness with none of the first novel’s trappings of setting.

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Steampunk for the Modern Age: A Review of The Queen of all Crows, by Rod Duncan

Steampunk is one of the more niche genres of fiction around, never having made it into the mainstream lexicon of literature.  Steampunk as a genre is defined by setting and technology.  Imagine a world where steam-power became the dominate energy source and defined the aesthetic for the world.  Grimy cities full of pipes and fog.  Electrical contraptions plucked straight from the mind of Nikola Tesla.  Airships dominating the sky as the primary form of transportation.  Steampunk as a genre is what happens when creators take the inherent fascination with everything Victorian and turn-of-the-century, and imagine a world where technology continued upon that path.  Victorian sensibilities and imperialism coupled with science-fiction technologies.  Overall, the steampunk aesthetic is one of the most fascinating.

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