I ♥ NYC: A Review of The City We Became, by N. K. Jemisin

While this blog has been, and always will be, a great proponent of fantasy, most of the fantasy novels I have reviewed skew towards variations of high fantasy.  Almost all take place in an alternate world; that is, not Earth in the present day or accurate history.  For many authors, creating an entirely new world can actually be much easier than trying to base your fantasy in the real world.  By creating your own world, you set the rules.  Magic works, or does not work, as you see fit.  However, even in these fantastical lands, authors are still able to talk about modern issues, usually through coded language and stand-ins.  For example, the Na’vi in the film Avatar are used as a stand-in for the many indigenous tribes of North America around the time of European colonization.  However, urban fantasy is a different beast altogether.  By using the real, modern-day world, such subjects can be tackled head-on, without euphemism or substitution.

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Soul Flight: A Review of The Nightjar, by Deborah Hewitt

Fantasy is a malleable genre, with one of the more popular variations in the last several decades being the urban fantasy.  Combining the realism of our magic free world with the trappings of high fantasy has proven to be a fascinating juxtaposition.  Imagine a seedy mob-run nightclub in a bustling city, serving a clientele of elves and ogres.  Goblins operate as drug runners and wizards assist the police with investigative magic.  With urban fantasy, the two worlds may be completely combined, or kept separate through shadowy cabals or government organizations.  The fantasy elements may also be as high or as low as the author wishes.  While The Dresden Files may be one of the more famous examples of low urban fantasy, other authors are rising up to take its place.  The Nightjar, by Deborah Hewitt, is one such novel.

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